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Apr 6, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

What is it with the obsession against fevers? I don't mean the ones so high it can kill a person, but everything else. I was at a dinner recently with a newly retired nurse and the topic of Tylenol came up - she promotes it and takes it herself for everything, and gave it to patients for decades. Stop fevers, stop pain, stop inflammation - all with Tylenol.

I think there is a big confusion between suppressing symptoms and addressing root causes, and it leads to all sorts of subsequent problems, like preventing anything that may actually cause a fever.

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Apr 6, 2022·edited Apr 6, 2022Author

"What is it with the obsession against fevers?"

In my opinion, modern medicine has a somewhat religious obsession with blocking natural responses, or cutting off body parts that pose problems (tonsils, penises, etc.) It's almost as if modern medicine has a concept of original sin.

Over-treatment of all kinds of diseases is militaristic and institutionalized. A return to the rules of science is essential.

There are a lot of modern myths floating around. The idea that fevers over 104F are particularly dangerous is one of them.

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Re "In my opinion, modern medicine has a somewhat religious obsession with blocking natural responses, or cutting off body parts that pose problems (tonsils, penises, etc.) It's almost as if modern medicine has a concept of original sin."

Very good comment. It is as though they took Jesus's words regarding 'if your hand sins cut if off' etc. literally rather than in the spirit it was meant.

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Just amputating the sinning-hand would already be an improvement if we consider what happened to Onan.

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Apr 6, 2022·edited Apr 6, 2022Author

Of course! And with devastating real-world consequences for patients for the past 70-100+ years. Antipyretics block one of the most essential and evolutionarily conserved healing responses in warm-blooded animals.

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Apr 6, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

John Campbell, a pretty mainstream youtuber has also questioned routinely treating fevers.

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Apr 11, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Anthroposophical medicine, as a 'fringe' counter-example, is very against suppressing childhood fevers, or any fevers really.

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The rule once was feed a cold, starve a fever. Plenty of liquids and vitamin C for fevers to remove the toxins as quickly as possible. Tylenol is neuro-toxic and should be avoided like the plague. Big pharma won't be happy but tough.

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Tylenol should be illegal

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Apr 7, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

And the best way to stop embedded C Diff that refuses treatment by meds - insertion of healthy poop into the patient. Disgusting mentally but the healthy person's bacterial mix puts the the C Diff swarm in it's place. We hardly understand the biology of our gut.

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author

Right.

I believe the FDA now regulated this procedure as a “medical device.”

🙄

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My 81 year old neighbor has been struggling with C Diff since an infection in his face after surgery to repair a fistula. I mentioned this procedure to his wife - of course she'd never heard of it - she had to ask his doc who told her they would only consider it if he had more bouts of it. I can't help but wonder how long they will let him suffer. It's tragic what is going on in medicine.

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Apr 7, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Fascinating stuff.

Incidentally, at a recent homeopathy summit, several homeopaths noted that the patients who consulted them for help with long covid had something in common. They had taken antipyretics when feverish with covid.

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author

This doesn't surprise me at all! Thank you for stopping by to let me know... it's another little piece of evidence.

You may enjoy this paper, "Fever: Could A Cardinal Sign of COVID-19 Infection Reduce Mortality?"

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002962921000045

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Excellent article. I recently got over a bad cold in about 3 days by following my own body's inclination to eat very little and rest. I took no pain or anti-fever meds, just supplements, herbs and occasional hot tea and hot soup.

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What a brilliant article! Thanks for sharing.

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Hi Monica, I appreciate this article I had some thoughts on it I wanted to share for you. Please let me know if you can read through this.

As you might guess, I have a lot of issues with the way cancer has been treated and the various treatments for that have gotten buried by history (for example I read Ralph Moss's book years ago-my favorite one in the genre was Politics and Healing).

I have also seen hyperthermia benefit numerous cancer patients and individuals with other diseases.

I saw the following video on the subject a while back. It is a bit long, but I suspect despite your background that there are things with unless you are not familiar with:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPBdCpOh-8k&

At the start of the pandemic I spent hundreds of hours going through everything I had ever been written about the 1918 influenza. In that I found that all the physicians he successfully treated it nurtured the fever rather than suppressing it, and empirically determined which therapies were effective for treating the 1918 influenza basing in on which of them caused the fever to break naturally (whereas taking aspirin was typically fatal, although they were taking much higher doses at that time). Occasionally ice was placed on the head or on a tachycardic chest but nothing more to directly suppress the fever. (at some point I will write a longer article on this)

I have believed for a while that one of the primary things that has been causing people to die from Covid were the continual instructions to suppress the fevers, and I have seen various data points that have emerged supporting this hypothesis.

I have treated a lot of people for Covid, so there is no doubt in my mind that the disease is quite dangerous and has to be treated appropriately. I have the unfortunate luck to get Covid while I was traveling I had no access to support or any of the therapeutic I'd used, so I did a bare-bones approach and try to heat myself up as much as possible, water fasted and rested as much as possible. My body went haywire for about a day (I have never been that ill before), which I have never experienced before, but once it was done it took a few days for my energy to come back, and when it was all done I actually felt dramatically better than I had prior to getting Covid. My own belief is that this is the way the body is actually supposed to process a lot of diseases and viral conditions (although there are often a lot of extra things you can bring into the picture to make sure there's no bad outcome).

One of the hypotheses I have been exploring with vaccine injuries and long-haul Covid is that the temperature regulation in the body gets disrupted, and patients fall into the same pattern the doctor and above video identified for individual who will benefit from mistletoe therapy to treat cancer. I have not yet been able to have any vaccine injured patients actually chart their body temperatures to see if the thermal dysregulation the mistletoe community has identified occurs.

Assuming this theory is right, I think there are three ways I know of that can potentially correct this problem.

1) Mistletoe therapy

2) Choley's Toxins

3) Cantharidin

Another interesting thing I discovered was that back in the 1800s, one physician pioneered using fever blister (Cantharidin) as a treatment for smallpox, and as a vaccination for it. What he essentially found was that giving periodic injections of Cantharidin restored the general immune function in patients, where as the smallpox vaccine often destroyed it, and it was the patients who had an intact immune system I did not catch smallpox. He studied this on a lot of people and had close to 100% success rate and using fever blister for small pox.

So, all of this represents tentative hypothesis but I have a strong suspicion once described above is integral to mitigating the effects of the Covid vaccinations.

Thank you for reading, thank you for your support of myself stack and please let me know your thoughts. It's wonderful you are making the toxins in a sterile enviornment. Finding good sources for these types of things when you do alternative cancer care is very challenging...

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Jun 9, 2022·edited Jun 9, 2022Author

Oh, and another brief note. Endless little "connections" such as this which could be made.

Justin Bieber is suffering from Lyme and mono. Wonder how many spikeshots were taken?

https://www.coffeeandcovid.com/p/-coffee-and-covid-thursday-june-9?s=r

As you know, Lyme is one of those interesting diseases caused by spirochetes... much like syphilis.

Interestingly, malariotherapy (really a form of fever therapy) has been successfully used to treat syphilis. I have a hunch that fever therapy with Coley's or mistletoe could be useful in treating Lyme based on this history, and probably safer than administration of a live organism, too. (As you no doubt know in late stages, both diseases may have neurological complications.)

https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJM199004263221713

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/398731

Does the specific TLR ligand(s) matter? I don't know.

I'm fairly torn up at the moment over the loss of my friend, as I suspect he may have been suffering from Lyme all these years. I can't prove it but there were some telltale signs. If the literature is any guide, treating occult infections and autoimmune disease with fever therapy is much easier than treating cancer.

It's therefore very difficult to hold a potential piece of the puzzle for someone's recovery and wellness... because in an insane world, those of us with potentially interesting ideas and novel solutions are dismissed or deemed crazy.

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Hi “Doc” ;) :)

A fascinating comment that could be turned into a post of its own, filled with wisdom. Thank you so much for dropping that. I skimmed last night but wanted to wait to formulate a more complete reply.

I look forward to checking out the Gorter video. I’ve long been of the belief that most cancer and also autoimmune disease is a function of immune dysregulation.

I think one of the reasons hyperthermia may benefit those with autoimmune disease, for instance, is that some of those conditions may be caused by occult infections. There is a history of mixed bacterial vaccines and fever therapy prior to WWII being used to successfully treat UC, schizophrenia, etc. I also suspect Strep injections could be very useful for rheumatoid arthritis.

And I think you’re quite right about the 1918 pandemic. In fact, a colleague of mine wrote an interesting article tying together some of the mysteries of fever (or lack thereof) and mortality from infectious disease.

You may enjoy his paper, "Fever: Could A Cardinal Sign of COVID-19 Infection Reduce Mortality?"

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002962921000045

He had a hell of a time getting that published.

It’s interesting how many people are independently arriving at similar conclusions.

I think you’re obviously right about the fever. You want to let fever go if you can, as it puts the virus at a thermal disadvantage.

But there’s a potentially more crucial reason. As you no doubt know, if you lower fever with Tylenol, it can cause cutaneous vasodilation and lowering of blood pressure.

Early in the pandemic, at least (I lost touch with what was going on in later stages), medical staff then gave the covid patients fluids to raise their blood pressure, which turned the patients into big bags of water and filled the lungs, which then resulted in patients being put on ventilators.

Offering so much much “supportive care” is worse than doing nothing, and it speaks to the issue you have been highlighting on your Substack: the widespread and systemic indoctrination and epistemological problems that are problematic in the medical industry. We’re living in a medical Dark Ages, almost.

People are not used to listening to and trusting their bodies. When I was sick with flu last week, there was one day when got chills and felt the innate need for my body to raise its temperature. I let my body do what it wanted, which in my case meant reclining on the back deck in 90 degree heat in the shade, fully clothed, with a blanket. For a few hours. During the entire course of the illness, I only took one pain reliever well past the point of fever (perhaps on day 4), to quell a headache, which was possibly caused by drinking too much water without electrolytes.

I also don’t “hydrate” as is the constant conventional wisdom. If I’m thirsty I drink. If I’m not, I don’t. Simple.

We are the only warm-blooded species that does all of this inane stuff that other warm-blooded species do not do. It makes no sense and you need no scientific background whatsoever to understand it.

“One of the hypotheses I have been exploring with vaccine injuries and long-haul Covid is that the temperature regulation in the body gets disrupted, and patients fall into the same pattern the doctor and above video identified for individual who will benefit from mistletoe therapy to treat cancer. I have not yet been able to have any vaccine injured patients actually chart their body temperatures to see if the thermal dysregulation the mistletoe community has identified occurs.”

My colleague, who I linked to above, has a similar hypothesis. He actually thinks Coley’s toxins could be used to treat long covid (not that in the present vile environment, it could be easily done).

It might be time for me to take the leap of moving to Mexico and set up a long covid clinic. If the hypothesis is true, such patients could be pretty easily, quickly, and cheaply helped (unlike most cancer patients).

I think mistletoe injections work on a similar principle to Coley’s toxins. Mistletoe lectin is a TLR ligand. Coley’s toxins contains at least 6 TLR ligands that we know about (possibly more — in terms of mechanism, it’s deeply understudied).

I never knew the history of cantharidin for smallpox treatment! I haven’t looked into its biochemistry but I wonder if it (and compounds in bloodroot, for instance), are TLR ligands. Thank you for sharing this insight!

One of the things that doesn’t get highlighted much on “our side” of things is that ivermectin actually reduces MDSCs and T regs. I think that’s actually primarily how it works.

Innate immunity is where it’s at.

You are free to email me privately at any time by responding to any of my emailed posts. Cheers.

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Thanks for your reply. Hope you enjoy the video. Your friends experience is part of why I gave up getting things published except in very select non-controversial fields. Too much hassle and politics.

1) I believe there’s a certain portion of the population that carries chronic mycoplasma infections and when their immune systems get weak the infections come to the surface and make them sick. One person I’ve corresponded with was able to map this out to certain COVID-19 illnesses and vaccine reactions.

2) I’ve looked in support groups for the lyme community and Ive seen a few cases of lyme becoming much worse after vaccination, but from what I saw, it’s nowhere near as common as I expected it to be based upon the immune suppression the vaccines create.

3) There’s a treatment done in Germany for Lyme disease where hyperthermia is combined with antibiotics. Some chronic lyme patients have had a lot of success with it, and I periodically hear of it mentioned as a last ditch option for treating Lyme. However, given the hyperthermia involved it’s not legal in the USA.

4) My own opinion is that the primary value of IV fluids is that restore the colloidal dispersion within the body (which tanks in COVID) but when it’s done excessively (too much NaCl is added) the effect reverses and colloidal clumping instead occurs. I think that a major error most westerns make is that they assume if something is good for you, more is better, which is often not the case.

5) I believe a major benefit/mechanism of fevers is that the disperse congested fluids and allow cells to cycle intracellular waste products to the extra cellular space.

6 ) A lot of times you can get the same benefits (or better) that you get with fever therapy by using ultraviolet blood irradiation, and for example with lyme I know of numerous cases where UVBI was combined with anitbiotics to get a similar result.

7) The water strategy I’ve seen empiricly prove itself the best for health, vitality and preventing critical illnesses is drinking 1-2 liters of reverse osmosis water a day. You can potentially make an argument for a deuterium depleted water diet or a structured water diet, but those are both much more complied.

8) One thing I feel torn over is that for me personally (and a few colleagues) we’ve rarely seen ivermectin help for COVID (whereas many other things do). I’m not sure if that’s because our faith in non-pharmaceutical methods distorts reality so pharmaceuticals do not work or because the benefit of Ivermectin has been massively overstated. Every time I’ve tried to bring this up with physicians treating COVID, I get an angry rejection of that claim and dozens of studies sent to me. I’ve also had patients take too much Ivermectin and be sick for at least a week from it, so I do not believe it’s 100% safe. At the same time, I’m not opposed to the drug and it is amazing for parasites (and sometimes lyme), but I don’t feel confident in using it for COVID.

9) I am hoping to do something like that, but just not advertise it so I can do it in the USA rather than Mexico.

10) So far exosomes (from a mother who has just delivered, not from adult stem cells) have proven themselves as the best treatment for treating long COVID but they are a bit expensive.

11) I never knew malaria therapy was practice for the same purpose (which is quite interesting). A lot of people have noticed the malaria medications work quite well against COVID (including some no one is aware of), and I’ve often wondered if there is a babesia component to the disease (as it’s a common parasite in the USA that has overlaps with malaria).

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Apr 8, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

What an awesome, interesting article. I will be sharing on my Substack. I think this concept makes complete sense. To me when the body has an infection the natural immune system (for those of us that still have one and have not had it destroyed by a barrage of vaccines) kicks into overdrive and not only fights the infection but attacks the cancer too. That is just my uneducated opinion to explain why an infection might also fight off and cure a cancer in the body.

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"That is just my uneducated opinion"

You said it. It was already clear when you said something so stupid as vaccines destroying the immune system when they're exactly the same as Coley's toxins, an inactivated pathogen that stimulate adaptative immunity and a bunch of adjuvants that stimulate the innate one. If you're uneducated why do you talk about topics you couldn't even read an elementary school level book?

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Apr 13, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Hello Monica, the first time I heard about Coley’s toxin was from you and I started to follow you ever since. You caught my attention because my 15 year old son has been battling Synovial Sarcoma Spindle Cell since December 2020. It started in the soft tissue of his face, in his cheek/mandible specifically. After he had his tumor removed, underwent chemotherapy and proton radiation it was somewhat successful. Unfortunately we found out that the cancer had spread to both of his lungs. We are still very much in this fight! He started taking different types of medication. However, the cancer in his lungs is still growing and multiplying. We feel hostages to health care and the big pharma in the USA. Even more because he’s a minor and hardly any clinic will offer alternative treatments to a minor.

If possible, how could I contact you to get more information regarding Coley’s Toxin? If you can contact me, please write to this email

brazilnut2022@gmail.com

I truly believe that God has put you in my path and really appreciate if you can share your knowledge and expertise.

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My interest in Coley's Toxins is from looking into the many pro tumor pathways from exposure to spike protein gene therapies.

Immunostimulatory therapies may help break the tumor induced immunosuppression, to disrupt the pro tumor positive feedback loop.

Oncology Meets Immunology: The Cancer-Immunity Cycle (2013): Beware treatments that can disrupt this cycle

https://doorlesscarp953.substack.com/p/oncology-meets-immunology-the-cancer?s=w

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Yes! There are two things that come to mind with Coley's. One is that the many PAMPs in the vaccine stimulate toll-like receptors on dendritic cells. The other is that they may affect the cell cycle. I'm not sure of the mechanism for the second but there's one paper suggesting that this happens.

Did you see the piece Malone wrote a couple of weeks ago about how the mRNA vaccines are screwing up innate immunity via the toll-like receptors on dendritic cells? I actually think Coley's toxins could be a powerful therapy to help people recover from long covid and vaccine injury, because they do the opposite.

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Apr 7, 2022·edited Apr 7, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Yes, I looked into that and the pseudouridine substitutions are implicated:

Spike protein (inc vax) induced immunodeficiency & carcinogenesis megathread #14: pseudouridines in mRNA transfection agents

Summary: pseudouridines in mRNA transfection agents can lead to the downregulation of certain toll like receptors, including TLR4...which is yet another tumor suppressor.

https://doorlesscarp953.substack.com/p/spike-protein-inc-vax-induced-immunodeficiency-e90/comments?s=w

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Apr 6, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Thanks. That was very interesting. How long does the Coley’s treatment cause the fever to run? Also wondering how sauna’s would play into this by raising your body temperature too, as have known they can be healing. Also since the bacteria is heat treated then how does it cause infection? Is it still viable but just attenuated? Thanks

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“How long does the Coley’s treatment cause the fever to run?”

It depends on the patient and the route of administration. If given subcutaneously, it may take up to 12 hours for the fever to occur. If given intramuscularly or intravenously, much sooner (onset after an hour or two). Generally the fever can run for a few hours if one is achieved at all. (If one does not, the dose is raised for target fever to be achieved.)

I have no doubt that saunas could be very helpful. Hyperthermia without fever is most popular in Germany where there is a hyperthermia association: it probably increases the production of heat shock proteins on the surface of cancer cells, which can lead to an immune response.

Generally, I think core hyperthermia is not as effective as Coley’s toxins because there are many other molecular triggers from molecules known as PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) that stimulate a wide array of cytokines to be produced by the body.

“Also since the bacteria is heat treated then how does it cause infection?”

Sorry if that was unclear! It doesn’t. But it does result in a similar response to the body that would occur during a natural infection.

“Is it still viable but just attenuated?”

No. In this case it is entirely sterile and dead.

There is a researcher in Russia who is interested in producing Coley’s toxins with a live, nonpathogenic strain of Streptococcus pyogenes, but in my opinion, something like that is unlikely to happen in the west due to regulatory roadblocks and cultural issues. Maybe if we give it a few decades, but I’m probably having fever dreams. ;)

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Also, take a look at the Sharon Brockman video embedded in the post. They wanted to use hyperthermia on her leg, locally (with chemotherapy). So, oncology does recognize the healing value of heat. Generally when it is done in the US it's combined with chemo.

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Jackeroo I’m so glad you asked the questions you did. I was wondering the exact same!

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Apr 13, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

God bless you for your brave pursuit Dr. Hughes. I will be sure to keep this invaluable information in case myself or a loved one ever needs it.

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Apr 13, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Hello Monica, the first time I heard about Coley’s toxin was from you and I started to follow you ever since. You caught my attention because my 15 year old son has been battling Synovial Sarcoma Spindle Cell since December 2020. It started in the soft tissue of his face, in his cheek/mandible specifically. After he had his tumor removed, underwent chemotherapy and proton radiation it was somewhat successful. Unfortunately we found out that the cancer had spread to both of his lungs. We are still very much in this fight! He started taking different types of medication. However, the cancer in his lungs is still growing and multiplying. We feel hostages to health care and the big pharma in the USA. Even more because he’s a minor and hardly any clinic will offer alternative treatments to a minor.

If possible, how could I contact you to get more information regarding Coley’s Toxin? If you can contact me, please write to this email

brazilnut2022@gmail.com

I truly believe that God has put you in my path and really appreciate if you can share your knowledge and expertise.

Expand full comment
Apr 7, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

great read. thank you for sharing it

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Spontaneous regression is the norm. Cancer is as old as life itself. The immune system has evolved to take care of it.

https://childrenshealthdefense.org/news/vaccines-containing-animal-plant-fungal-proteins-cause-autoimmune-diseases-and-cancer/

https://zenodo.org/record/1407617

Credit where credit is due: Cow's milk contaminated vaccines prevent cancer ... by causing autism

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1038485

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Monica, you're giving likes to a guy saying the stupidity of vaccines causing autism, while calling yourself phD.

Is supporting Coley's toxins, an empirically proved treatment, necessarily related to buying the full bag of conspiranoid quackery bullshit? Like, what else, reiki and crystals? You can distinguish between FDA being assholes and believing stupidities like vaccines causing autism.

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You’re the one setting up a false dichotomy and a package deal, “la.” At least I’m not a coward and I use my full real name. 😁

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Of course vaccines cause autism. We have mechanistic evidence that proves it beyond a doubt. Epidemiological studies only provide association not causation. Epidemiological studies are wrong 93% of the time per IOM. And these same broken epidemiological studies are used to make the fraudulent claim that "vaccines do not cause autism".

Cow's milk protein contaminated vaccines cause 75% of autism cases

https://vinuarumugham.substack.com/p/cows-milk-protein-contaminated-vaccines

You are welcome to challenge any part, but please do not bring the same broken epidemiological studies.

Epidemiological studies that ignore mechanism of disease causation are flawed and mechanistic evidence demonstrates that vaccines cause autism

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1041905

Institute of Medicine: Most epidemiological vaccine safety studies are useless

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3244496

The Pharma captured "regulators" have been lying to you for decades. Why do you think autism was an exception?

"Please note, I have tried for over a decade to study vaccine risks in pregnant mothers and infants with concerns about neurodevelopmental risks. There are known and suspected risks, but the overwhelming dogma is that being critical of vaccines will damage the public benefit of vaccines. It makes for poor funding and science, as one needs to quantitate these risks to make such a judgement, and most researchers are not willing to potentially bite the hands that feed them/us: FDA, CDC, NIH, NIMH, etc." - Associate Professor, top Texas medical school, via email to me.

THE CDC JUST SOLIDIFIED THAT ITS DECISIONS ARE NOT DRIVEN BY SCIENCE

https://www.icandecide.org/ican_press/the-cdc-just-solidified-that-its-decisions-are-not-driven-by-science/

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How (specifically) do you think that the immune system has evolved to 'take care' of cancer? Do you have any evidence (actual research results, not your own opinion pieces) supporting your statement that "To prevent cancer, the immune system is capable of making antibodies against such altered peptides"?

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author

"To prevent cancer, the immune system is capable of making antibodies against such altered peptides"

When you put that sentence into a search engine, the results are interesting. Cheers!

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The results are interesting, but I don't see anything supporting Vinu's hypothesis, and I doubt he was referring to immunotherapy.

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Cancer immunotherapy is like building aircraft by learning from bird flight. Cancer "immunotherapy" is naturally occurring. But nothing is perfect. Even a healthy immune system may occasionally miss a cancer especially in our carcinogenic societies where we induce way more cancer than in nature. So cancer immunotherapy sloppily attempts to help in those cases.

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Is there any chance you have some evidence to support your claims? I have a problem just 'taking your word for it'.

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If there is any chance that you can ever understand evidence, we would have seen it by now.

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He can speak for himself but I suspect he IS referring to immunotherapy, because we know that some TLRs on dendritic cells also have binding affinities for host molecules, too, like heat shock proteins, in addition to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns like CpG sequences, LPS, and so on.

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We'll see. But if you read his 'publication', you'll understand why I doubt it.

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Jun 16, 2022·edited Jun 16, 2022Author

Which one? He links three. Please be specific.

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Why do you think the human immune system rejects organ transplants? Organs were not being transplanted into us during evolution. How/why did the immune system learn to reject transplants? During evolution we developed an immune surveillance system to detect altered antigens (the result of mutations) to protect against cancer. Therefore, for the immune system, an organ transplant (which expresses antigens slightly different from self) is indistinguishable from cancer - transplant rejection is the result.

Details:

Cancer immunology, bioinformatics and chemokine evidence link vaccines contaminated with animal proteins to autoimmune disease: a detailed look at Crohn's disease and Vitiligo

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1034776

Vaccine-induced autoimmunity in the dog

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9890057/

"Perhaps the simplest and most likely mechanism is that of cross-reactivity of vaccine and self-antigens. (Schattner and Rager-Ziaman, 1990), the most likely sources of cross-reactive epitopes are bovine serum and cell culture components. These are present in almost all vaccines as residual components of the cell culture necessary to generate vaccine viruses and may purposely be added to the vaccine as a stabilizer. In the presence of an adjuvant, these bovine products stimulate a strong immune response and induce antibodies that cross-react with conserved canine antigens."

The bovine antigens in the vaccine look like altered canine antigens or canine cancer, to the canine immune system.

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You know that your citations don't prove what you think they do? Do you have any other citations?

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Apr 11, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

So cool! I had never heard of Coley’s toxins before. Thank you for opening my eyes to it. Vera’s story was particularly touching. Her smile is wonderful, as is the story of her recovery. What a wonderful thing to have engaged in while you had the opportunity. Hopefully, there are others that continue to work on production. You deserve many hugs from human beings for this work!

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<3

There is a big clinic in Mexico that I set up with a lab and they are capable of production independent from me.

I will set up my business in another jurisdiction to supply my other clients. Generally speaking, their usage is small enough that it wouldn't justify building them each their own lab. Yet.

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Apr 9, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Just a quick note to tell you how much your writing means to me -- I always learn something, I often laugh, and I sometimes weep. Thank you.

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author

Wow! Thank you. <3

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Yowsers! Absolutely fascinating. I've heard you talk about Coley's toxins in the chat but never knew that what you were talking about is this promising! What an incredibly important work. Thank you for taking us on this journey. I signal boosted it on my social media.

I lost my stepdad to glioblastoma. It was quick, about a year and a half. My close friend just lost her dad to the same thing, again it happened super fast, less than two years. Given the aggressive malignant nature of glioblastoma, do you think Coley's can have an effect? Also, given the uptick in out-of-the-blue cancers this past year (especially if they are spike shot induced), what is the likelihood of Coley's working for jabbed cancer patients?

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Thank you! <3

I'm very sorry to hear about your granddad and friend's dad. They lived longer than normal for the glioblastoma patients, believe it or not.

My husband was treated with Coley's and died of glioblastoma as well. Rather than type all of that out, perhaps I'll make a post about it. These are the personal stories I want to weave into a book but they take more emotional energy and editing than writing the funny or the scientific stuff.

Although Robb was not cured, he did have a very good quality of life for a year, which is the median survival of someone with GBM. Especially for his age. He was 60. Without surgery they predicted he'd have been gone in 2 months. Without treatment, no more than 6.

Three weeks before he died, just the day before his second surgery and about a year after he had his first seizure, he cut down 7 trees in the backyard.

I definitely credit the treatment for that, though he did have a pretty incredible ability to maintain homeostasis. After the surgery, we just could not control the swelling.

There are two things that come to mind with Coley's with regard to treating anybody with vaccine injury, long covid, or vaccine-jabbed cancer patients. One is that the many PAMPs in the vaccine stimulate toll-like receptors on dendritic cells. The other is that they may affect the cell cycle by forcing damaged cells to apoptose. I'm not sure of the mechanism for the second but there's one paper suggesting that this happens.

Did you see the piece Malone wrote a couple of weeks ago about how the mRNA vaccines are screwing up innate immunity via the toll-like receptors on dendritic cells? I actually think Coley's toxins could be a powerful therapy to help people recover from long covid and vaccine injury, because they do the opposite.

I don't want to sound crazy, and the reason I resisted a public face for a long time is because regulatory agencies don't permit you to make claims about unapproved medications. Even private emails to colleagues could be interpreted in this manner in NZ.

But there's a lot of stuff that Coley's toxins could probably treat, especially autoimmune disease. Fever therapy went by the wayside after WWII and the invention of antibiotics, but there were a number of therapeutic bacterial vaccines that were quite useful against a variety of conditions. They were used for everything, from shizophrenia to ulcerative colitis.

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Yeah, I read Malone’s article. This is an interesting hypothesis and perhaps this question would be answered in a follow up article (and I’m more than willing to wait to read that and your personal rollercoaster with Robb there), but is there a danger to using Coley’s that can make a condition worse? Does the treatment itself have side effects?

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Sometimes patients can experience SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome). This can land them in the ER. It's pretty uncommon, maybe one in a few hundred cases, but often these crises are associated with a compete durable response. This hypothesis is supported in the medical literature. It's an interesting dilemma.

There was one case historically where the tumor burden was exceptionally large and the dose was way too high and the person died. This was in the early 1900s in Coley's day. People with extremely large tumors must be handled carefully because the body needs time to clear the tumor. Doses need to be small, the tumor should not be injected directly (which leads to a greater immune response), etc.

To my knowledge, the therapy does not have side effects (i.e. long-term damage) in the sense of radiation or chemo. In fact, generally the day after a session, people have a bit of euphoria kind of like people do in the days after they recover from illnesses and their fever abates. They bounce back, feel better, have more energy and clearheadedness, have a big appetite, and are ready to undergo treatment again (even though it can be quite unpleasant). I don't know anyone who felt an enhanced sense of well being or wanted to indulge in a large meal a few hours after chemo sessions.

Over the long term, it can make a patient anemic because one of the ways the body protects against infection is to sequester iron to deprive bacteria of it. If a patient is at an advanced stage of disease and have been through many months of therapy, the body simply may not have enough resources to mount the healing response. Experiencing fever all the time is metabolically expensive, whether it's through natural infection or Coley's, so patients need good nutrition.

But people can get quite sick from it during the treatment, just as they would get sick from an infection, experiencing all the typical signs and symptoms: fever, nausea, diarrhea, etc. So it's important for a physician to guide the therapy carefully according to the clinical protocol.

But the PAMPs are toxins the body is evolutionarily equipped to handle. For hundreds of millions of years we have co-evolved with pathogens. It's not a modern industrial poison that just arrived on the evolutionary scene that the body has no clue yet what to do with.

It's important to remember that what people think of as "side effects" are often how the body heals, not something that should be suppressed or blocked. Fever, redness, swelling are not side effects. They are a crucial healing response.

It's difficult for me to imagine that Coley's would make anyone worse. The fever generally lasts a few hours, and usually not more than 12.

There are certain contraindications like pregnancy, heart conditions, etc. The biggest potential problem I can think of is simply that it wouldn't work.

As for brain cancer specifically, there is an additional risk but it occurs with any immunotherapy, in that there isn't much room for the brain to expand! Swelling in the brain IS a problem, and many immunotherapies can cause that. So it's important to go low and slow.

Many immunotherapy clinics in Mexico don't take glioblastoma patients because edema is a unique problem in this cancer. Generally alternative brain cancer clinics stick to metabolic or other therapy, not immunotherapy.

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Thank you for all your invaluable information.

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Jul 6, 2022Liked by Monica Hughes PhD

Oh goodness. I commented previously when I had only read your post. Then I read through the comments! Bonus gold mine! So many rabbit trails I want to follow, I had to make a list. First and foremost on that list are certain points in the comments and responses from/to “A Midwestern Doctor”, whose Substack I also greatly enjoy; Lyme disease, malariotherapy, hyperthermia therapy for autoimmune disease, TLR ligands, mistletoe therapy, chronic mycoplasma infections, deuterium depleted water, and much more. These terms and ideas are directly relevant to myself and my family as I am healing from chronic Lyme disease and multiple coinfections, including babesia, bartonella, mycoplasma, CMV, etc. I was a regular Petri dish party! ;)

The one seed I would like to plant with Dr Monica and Midwestern Doc, is the under realized issue of mold as a root cause of chronic disease, particularly Lyme disease. I’m not talking about outside mold. Outdoor mold is in natural competition with other molds, and is directly limited by sunlight and oxygen. Mold in our living spaces is the issue. It is insidious, often hidden from view, and typically a slow acting poison. The list of symptoms is long and shares commonality with so many other diseases that it is often misdiagnosed and therefore pharmaceutically managed. I have found mold to be a primary root cause of immune and hormone dysfunction, both in myself and in my immediate family. Just a thought to consider!

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